Mine Creek

Mine Creek Battle

Mine Creek

Battle of the Osage

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About six miles south of Trading Post, Kansas, where the Marais de Cygnes cavalry engagement had occurred earlier in the day, the Union brigades of Col. Frederick Benteen and Col. John Phillips, of Maj. Gen. Alfred Pleasonton’s Provisional Cavalry Division, overtook a retreating Confederate cavalry column from Maj. Gen Sterling Price's Army of Missouri crossing Mine Creek. The rebels, stalled by their 500-wagon supply train crossing the rain-swollen ford, formed a line of about 7,000 men on the north side of the creek. The Federals, although outnumbered by about 4,000 men, attacked as additional troops from Pleasonton’s command arrived during the fight. The Union troopers soon surrounded the Confederates, resulting in the capture of almost 1,000 men and two brigadier generals, John S. Marmaduke and William L. Cabell. The Confederates retreated, and reengaged the Yankee cavalry a few hours later at the Marimton River, losing that skirmish also and pushing Price's army further south. Having lost many men, Price’s goal of occupying Kansas and Missouri was doomed. Price was forced out of Kansas and his Missouri Campaign ended.  Mine Creek was the largest Civil War battle fought in Kansas and one of the largest cavalry engagements of the Civil War.

Battle Facts

Result

Union Victory
COMMANDERS
Forces Engaged
9,500

Union

2,500

Confederate

7,000
Total Estimated Casualties
1,300

Union

100

Confederate

1,200