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Civil War Trust

Gettysburg Address Lesson Plan

Abraham Lincoln's Greatest Speech
By Chuck Teague (National Park Service) & The Civil War Trust

lincoln and address

Grades: 4-12

Approximate Length of Time: Approximately two 45 minute class periods

Goals:

Students will evaluate the role of Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address in the context of its place and time in history.
Students will examine how The Gettysburg Address is relevant in today’s society.

Objectives:

1. Students will be able to list at least two events that led up to Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address.
2. Students will be able to present an argument as to why Lincoln gave The Gettysburg Address.
3. Students will be able to summarize portions of the Gettysburg Address in their own words or present an overall summary of the document.
4. Students will be able to discuss why they believe the Gettysburg Address is still relevant in today’s society.

Materials:

The Great Task Video
The Gettysburg Address
Outline for the Gettysburg Address Power Point Parts 1 and 2
Outline for the Gettysburg Address Power Point Parts 3 and 4
Timeline to the Address
The Gettysburg Address Power Point Presentation Parts 1 and 2
The Gettysburg Address Power Point Presentation Parts 3 and 4
“Your Version” Worksheet
CNN.com

Vocabulary:

Conceive – to form a notion or idea
Proposition – a suggestion that something be done or thought about
Engaged – to be occupied with a task
Endure – to continue to exist or last
Consecrate – to make or declare sacred; set apart or dedicate
Hallow – to honor as holy or sacred
Detract – to draw away or divert attention
Devotion – dedication, or commitment to a cause
Vain – without real significance or value
Perish – to pass away or disappear

Anticipatory Set/Hook:

Play The Great Task video for your students, allowing them the opportunity to hear The Gettysburg Address.
Engage students in a discussion about what they just heard. Ask them:

• If they had ever heard this before
• Why do they think the director had the actors repeat certain lines
• Which parts stuck out or struck them the most
• When do they think this speech was originally given
• For what reason do they think this was given

Procedure:

Day 1:
Hand out a copy of the Timeline to the Address (PDF) to each student.
Hand out a copy of Outline for the Gettysburg Address Power Point Parts 1 and 2 (PDF).
Have students use the Outline to follow along as you present The Gettysburg Address Power Point Parts 1 and 2.
During the timeline portion, have students fill out their own timelines.

Day 2:
Hand out a copy of the Gettysburg Address (PDF) to each student.
Hand out a copy of Outline for the Gettysburg Address Power Point Parts 3 and 4 (PDF).
Have students use the Outline to follow along as you present The Gettysburg Address Power Point Parts 3 and 4.
During the discussion of the language used in the Address have students highlight important words or phrases in their copy of The Gettysburg Address.
Hand out a copy of the “Your Version” worksheet (PDF)to each student.
Have students complete their own version of the Gettysburg Address or have them write a summary of the Address.

Closure:

Hold a discussion using the questions: Why do you think the address is still relevant today?

Assessment:

Gather the Timeline and “Your Version” worksheets. These will be used to support the first two objectives.
Students will complete an essay addressing the question:
Why is The Gettysburg Address still relevant today?

  • Provide specific examples from current events
    o articles can be taken from today’s newspaper
    o or go to cnn.com
  • Use at least one quote from The Gettysburg Address.


Modification Ideas:

Have students revisit The Gettysburg Address Power Point on their own or for homework from their home computer before writing their final assessment question.

Allow students to work in pairs to answer the final assessment question.

Have students visit The Gettysburg Address Online Exhibit at the Library of Congress.

 

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