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Civil War Trust

Gettysburg 360

Educator's Guide
Civil War Trust

Gettysburg 360

THE CIVIL WAR CURRICULUM: Goals 4 and 9

COMMON CORE STANDARDS:
    R.CCR.1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,10
    W.CCR.1,2,4,7,9
    SL.CCR.1,2,3,4,5,6
    L.CCR.1,2,3,5,6

NCSS GOALS: I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, X

GRADE LEVEL: Middle School/High School/Advanced Placement

The Gettysburg 360 application is a great way to have students independently discover the American Civil War. Use the Gettysburg 360 application to wander the battlefield digitally. Explore clickable details, photographs, and videos with this interactive panoramic display of the Gettysburg Battlefield.

Below are ideas for how you and your students can use the application.


History Where It Happened

The Gettysburg 360 application is meant to give the user a sense of being on the historic battlefield.  By studying the history of the battle and the land where it took place, one can get a better sense of what happened and why it happened.

GOAL: Students will use Gettysburg 360 to study certain moments of the battle and analyze how the natural and built environment effected the maneuvers, strategies, and tactics used as well as the outcome.

  1. Have students tour the Gettysburg Battlefield using Gettysburg 360
  2. Students should focus on certain points in the battle where the natural and built environments affect what takes place.  Two suggestions are Little Round Top and the High Water Mark.
  3. Have students create an original piece of work related to their research.

Ideas include:

  • Create an illustration of how these natural and built features were used in the battle.
  • Write an account, as if you are a soldier describing your experience either at Little Round Top or the High Water Mark.

Honoring Those Who Fought: Monuments and Memorials

From the days immediately after the battle to the present, monuments have been placed on battlefields as reminders of the deeds of those who were there.  Gettysburg contains more monuments than any other battlefield in the country. Students can use the Gettysburg 360 application to see the monuments on the actual battlefield while gathering additional data.

GOAL: Students will use Gettysburg 360 to study the many monuments and memorials on the battlefield; noting such features as the symbolism and artwork on the monument, those being honored, placement, and timing of dedication.

  1. Have students tour the Gettysburg Battlefield using Gettysburg 360. 
  2. Students should take notes about the monuments identified throughout.
  3. Have students create an original piece of work related to their research.

Ideas include:

  • Designing their own monument for Gettysburg
  • Creating a guide for visitors to tour the monuments of Gettysburg
  • Writing a letter to a soldier who is being honored by a monument; telling them about the monument and how it is viewed today


RESOURCES:


Then and Now: The Battle, the Interim, and the Present

Throughout the Gettysburg 360 application, one can see how the battlefield changed over time, making Gettysburg one of the most well preserved Civil War battlefields in the country.  Many historic sites go through a process when being preserved.  This is an opportunity to see how a historic site goes through the process as well as a way to open the conversation on the benefits of historic preservation and their value in the study of our past.

GOAL:

Students will use Gettysburg 360 to study the way a historic place, such as the Gettysburg Battlefield, goes through changes over time on its way to being preserved. 

  1. Have students tour Gettysburg Battlefield using Gettysburg 360.
  2. Students should takes notes about the ways the battlefield has changed from the end of the battle in 1863 to the present day.
  3. Have students create original work.

Ideas include:

  • Research another historic site that is either being preserved or needs to be preserved, and then have them develop a preservation plan for that site
  • Research the ideology behind preservation of historic places and write an article arguing the benefits of historic preservation


RESOURCES:


Primary Sources: The Gettysburg Experience

Battlefield land holds the stories of men and women just like us who were caught up in the most intense experiences of their lives.  Many battlefield visitors will tell you that those experiences in some way sanctified or “hallowed” the ground.  This activity will give students the opportunity to more directly engage with stories, people, and places.

GOAL: Students will use Gettysburg 360 and primary sources to make personal connections with historical figures and the battlefield.   

  1. Have students tour the Gettysburg Battlefield using Gettysburg 360.
  2. Students should take notes about battlefield locations that especially interest them, picking between one and three to explore more deeply.
  3. Using the resources below and other search tools, students should find and compile primary source accounts that deal with the locations they have selected.  As before, students should choose accounts that they find particularly compelling.
  4. Students should present their chosen locations and accounts to the class.  Using the 360 application, students should demonstrate where on the field the account may have come from.  Students should explain why they chose their locations and accounts—what connections or emotions they might have felt.


RESOURCES:

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