Skip to main content

Civil War Trust

Tennessee

Tour Itineraries

Shiloh

Key

    family Cool for Kids


    Hike  Fun Hike


    Scenery  Impressive Views


    Tip  Insider Tip



Plan the Details

Need a hotel? Want to know where to eat? 

Visit the TripAdvisor page on Nashville, TN »

Discovery Trail:

Want to keep exploring the Civil War? Visit the Civil War Discovery Trail.

Discovery Trail Logo for RR

Discovery Trail Sites »

1 Day Trip


Jump to our 3 Day Tour!

Family Hike Scenery

Shiloh is one of the nation's oldest and best preserved battlefields. Shiloh was the first major battle in the Western theater. The April 6-7, 1862 battle involved about 65,000 Union and 44,000 Confederate troops, and resulted in nearly 24,000 casualties. Shiloh proved to be a decisive victory for the Union, enabling their advance on the important railroad junction at Corinth, Mississippi, one month later.

Before you go:

How to tour Shiloh:

  • Take the 12 mile, self-guided auto tour, with 20 stops.
  • Purchase an audio-tour CD in the bookstore.

 Time:  6 hours  Sites: 2  Radius: 9 miles

1. Shiloh

  • Begin at the Shiloh Battlefield Visitor Center, and see what ranger programs are being offered that day. While there, view the interpretive film, Shiloh: Fiery Trial, which is shown each hour.
  • Tour the Battlefield. Make sure to stop at the Peach Orchard, Hornet's Nest, and the Albert Sidney Johnston death site.

2. Corinth

  • Visit the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center, which traces the story of Corinth from the Civil War through Reconstruction. Check out the interactive exhibits and watch the short film, Corinth: A Town Amidst War.
  • Visit the Corinth Contraband Camp, where a Union general recruited African American refugees to serve in the army.

Shiloh
3 Day Trip


 Time:  3 days  Sites: 9  Radius: 90 miles

Jump to one of our sites:

1. Shiloh
2. Corinth 
3. Parker's Crossroads
4. Brice's Crossroads
5. Stone's River National Battlefield
6. Spring Hill Battlefield / Rippavilla Mansion
7. Franklin Battlefield / The Carter House
8. Shy's Hill
9. Ft. Donelson National Battlefield

Shiloh
1.
Shiloh

Family Hike Scenery

Shiloh is one of the nation's oldest and best preserved battlefields. Shiloh was the first major battle in the Western theater. The April 6 and 7, 1862 battle involved about 65,000 Union and 44,000 Confederate troops, and resulted in nearly 24,000 casualties. Shiloh proved to be a decisive victory for the Union, enabling their advance on the important railroad junction at Corinth, Mississippi, one month later.

Time: 3 hours

What to do:

Corinth
2.
Corinth

For six months in 1862, Corinth, Mississippi, a critical railroad junction considered second only to Richmond in military importance, captured the full attention of a divided nation. Corinth holds one of the National Park Service's newest visitor centers, which explains the key role of Corinth in the Civil War's western theater.

Time: 2 hours

What to do:

Parker's Crossroads
3.
Parker's Crossroads

The Battle of Parker's Crossroads was fought on December 31, 1862. When Confederate Lt. Gen. Forrest found himself caught between two Union forces, roughly the size of his own, he ordered his troops to "charge both ways" and successfully escaped.

Time: 1 hour

Before you go:

What to do:

  • Stop by the Visitor Center and walk the battlefield.

Brice's Crossroads
4.
Brice's Crossroads

The battle at Brice's Cross Roads in June 1864 prevented Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest from altering Union General Sherman’s supply line. Brice's Crossroads was the greatest strategic victory of the war, ranking with such battles in military history as Cannae, the Cowpens, and Tobruk.

Time: 2 hours

Before you go:

What to do:

  • Tour the Mississippi's Final Stands Interpretive Center , then drive to the battlefield.
  • Walk the interpretive trails and tour the Bethany A.R.P Church Cemetery.

Stone's River
5.
Stone's River National Battlefield

Family Hike Scenery

On December 31, 1862, advancing forces under Union general William Rosecrans fought a pitched battle with Braxton Bragg’s Army of Tennessee on the outskirts of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. The arrival of Union reinforcements made Bragg’s position untenable. He retreated on January 3, granting the North a valuable strategic victory in the middle of an otherwise dismal winter.

Time: 3 hours

Before you go: 

What to do:

  • Start at the Stone’s River National Battlefield Visitor Center, and find out what ranger programs are scheduled for the day.
  • Tour the battlefield. Make sure to visit Slaughter Pen, Hell’s Half Acre, Fortress Rosencrans, and Stone’s River National Cemetery.

Spring Hill
6.
Spring Hill Battlefield/Rippavilla Mansion

Spring Hill was the prelude to the Battle of Franklin.  Confederate forces under Gen. John Bell Hood skirmished with Federals headed to Franklin. The Union troops continued their march to Franklin on the night of November 29, 1862, in what many viewed as a missed opportunity for Hood to isolate and defeat the Union army. Hood and his generals were headquartered at the Rippavilla Mansion during this engagement.

Time: 2 hours

Before you go: 

What to do:

  • Tour the house and battlefield.

Franklin

7. Franklin Battlefield/The Carter House

Built in 1830, the Carter House was the location of the 1864 Battle of Franklin, fought November 30, 1864. The house and grounds, which served as a Federal command post before the battle and as a hospital after, are today preserved on ten acres. In this evening battle lasting only five hours, 6,000 Confederate soldiers, including six generals, were killed. More than one thousand bullet holes are still visible from the battle.

Time: 1.5 hours

Before you go: 

What to do:

  • Take a walking tour of the house and battlefield.
  • If you have time, visit Confederate Memorial Park at Winstead Hill.

Shy's Hill
8.
Shy's Hill

It was at Shy's Hill on Dec. 16, 1864, during the Battle of Nashville, that Federal troops finally broke the Confederate line on the left flank, resulting in a massive Rebel retreat and a decisive Union victory.

Time: 1 hour

Before you go: 

What to do:

  • Hike the tour route, stopping to read the interpretive markers.

Fort Donelson
9.
Ft. Donelson National Battlefield

The Battle of Fort Donelson was a Civil War engagement fought on February 13-16, 1862. The Confederate surrender to Ulysses S. Grant was the first major Civil War victory for the Union Army, and a devastating blow to the overall Confederate defense strategy. The military loss of forts Henry and Donelson forced the Confederate evacuation of middle and east Tennessee and relinquished the control of the Tennessee River, Cumberland River, Nashville, and most railroads within Tennessee to the Union Army.

Time: 3 hours

What to do:

  • Start at the Fort Donaldson National Battlefield Visitor Center, and check out the exhibits and displays. Be sure to watch the orientation film, Fort Donelson: Gateway to the Confederate Heartland.
  • Pick up a map for the self-guided, six mile tour. Stop at the Lower River batteries, Smith's Attack, the Dover Hotel, and the Fort Donelson National Cemetery.

Our Sponsors

Powered by Blackbaud
nonprofit software