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Civil War Trust

Lee's Headquarters: Unveiled!

Photos of the Completed Restoration

The Civil War Trust is proud to announce the completion of the restoration effort at site of General Lee's Headquarters in Gettysburg, after more than a year of work spend returning it to its 1863 appearance.

Check out these photos of rehabilitated the home, the landscape as returned to its Civil War appearance, and the newly installed interpretive walking trail on the property.

The Home

House
This small stone house – known as the Mary Thompson House – and adjacent lands served as a combat command center during one of the most decisive battles in American history. (Lynn Light Heller)
Then
Here is the structure, as it appeared during the Civil War. (Library of Congress)
Now
Here is the structure, as seen in October 2016. Relying on period photos, the home has been fully rehabilitated, with non-historic structures removed and distinctive features replaced.
Fences
A historically appropriate cedar shingle roof was added to the home. A combination of 5 rail post fencing and white picket fencing has been installed, as it was at the time of the battle. (Civil War Trust, Matt George)
Dog House
Details included adding the historically accurate dog house. (During its life as a museum, the details of the interior of the Mary Thompson House — such as this fireplace — were hidden from view by museum cases which housed artifacts.)
fireplace
During its life as a museum, the details of the interior of the Mary Thompson House — such as this fireplace — were hidden from view by museum cases which housed artifacts. (Civil War Trust, Matt George)
floor
The first floor will be used for special events or public meetings. (Civil War Trust, Matt George)

 

The 4-acre Property

Trail
To restore the site to its Civil War appearance, required the removal of the restaurant, swimming pool, non-essential parking lots, and the motel complex. (Civil War Trust, Matt George)

Landscape.
Relying on post-war surveys by Gen. Gouverneur K. Warren (a civil engineer who served at Gettysburg) and period photographs of the home and grounds, historic contours were added back to the site. (Civil War Trust, Matt George)

Barn
During the war, the property of James Dustman — Mary Thompson's immediate neighbor — served as a field hospital. The modern structure atop the Dustman Barn has been removed, keeping the stone foundation in place. (Civil War Trust, Matt George)


The Interpretive Trail

Trail Start
The interpretive trail, produced in conjunction with Civil War Trails, explains the dramatic events at the headquarters from July 1-3, 1863. (Civil War Trust, Matt George)
Lees Headquarters
Five interpretive signs tell the story. (Civil War Trust, Jim Campi)

Panel 1

Sign
(Civil War Trust, Matt George)

Panel 2

Sign

Panel 3

Sign

Panel 4

Sign

Panel 5

Thank you to all who supported the aquistion and restoration effort! 
Learn more with our Lee's Headquarters Preservation Timeline,
Videos, Photos and more »

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