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Civil War Trust

CWPT
For Immediate Release: 09/20/13

Civil War Trust Announces National "Honor Our Soldiers" Initiative

National campaign intended to recognize Civil War battlefields as living memorials to the service of all American soldiers, past and present

Honor Our SoldiersWASHINGTON, D.C. — The Civil War Trust, the nation’s largest nonprofit battlefield preservation organization, is proud to announce a new national campaign to honor American veterans, past and present.  The multi-media campaign will recognize the tremendous sacrifices made by our men and women in uniform, and includes an online petition — www.ipetitions.com/petition/honor-our-soldiers — through which concerned Americans can show their support for historic battlefield preservation.

“We see Civil War battlefields as living memorials to the courage and service of all of America’s military veterans,” remarked Civil War Trust President James Lighthizer.  “We share an incalculable debt to the many soldiers, sailors and airmen who have endured hardships and sacrificed for our freedom.  By preserving these battlefields, we celebrate their memory and honor their legacy.

The new “Honor Our Soldiers” campaign is intended to generate awareness about the acute plight of Civil War and other battlefields on U.S. soil.  Many of these historic shrines to our nation’s military have already been lost, and even more remain at risk of being destroyed beneath a bulldozer’s blade.  As an example, nearly 20 percent of our nation’s Civil War battlefields have already been lost to development — denied forever to future generations.  The “Honor Our Soldiers” campaign seeks to rally support for protecting those hallowed grounds that remain.

71st PennsylvaniaLighthizer was joined in the “Honor Our Soldiers” announcement by one of America’s most distinguished veterans, historian and preservationist Ed Bearss.  Bearss enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1942 and fought at Guadalcanal and the Russell Islands before being severely wounded at Suicide Creek on Cape Gloucester, New Britain.  After the war, Bearss went on to  become Chief Historian of the National Park Service — a position he continues to hold in an emeritus capacity.  According to Bearss:  “When I answered the call to serve my country in World War II, I felt a kinship with all those soldiers who had come before me.  I see preserving battlefields as a sacred duty that honors the legacy of their service.”

Lighthizer and Bearss both noted how preserved battlefields give Americans a unique opportunity to learn about the great personal cost paid by our ancestors to forge the freedoms we enjoy today.  Lighthizer in particular noted the monument of the 71st Pennsylvania Volunteer Regiment at the Angle at Gettysburg.  “Carved into that monument are the words ‘Patriotism’ and ‘Heroism.’  To me, that’s what battlefield preservation is all about.  It gives young and old alike an opportunity to walk in the footsteps of the patriots and heroes who have proudly worn our country’s uniform.  Protecting and visiting these places ensures that their bravery is never forgotten”

To honor our soldiers — both past and present — PLEASE SIGN the petition to show your support for the preservation of the hallowed battlegrounds on which Americans have fought and died.  Go to www.ipetitions.com/petition/honor-our-soldiers  or visit the website at www.HonorOurSoldiers.org.

The Civil War Trust is the largest nonprofit battlefield preservation organization in the United States.  Its mission is to preserve our nation’s endangered Civil War battlefields and to promote appreciation of these hallowed grounds.  To date, the Trust has preserved more than 36,000 acres of battlefield land in 20 states.  Learn more at www.civilwar.org, the home of the Civil War sesquicentennial.

Contacts

  • Jim Campi, (202) 367-1861 x7205
  • Mary Koik, (202) 367-1861 x7231

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