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Civil War Trust

Annual CWPT Conference [icon] Add to Calendar

Thursday, June 4 - Sunday, June 7, 2009

Tours: Thursday | Friday | Saturday

Thursday Tours

"Lincoln at Gettysburg" 
(Tour for CWPT Color Bearers)

President Abraham Lincoln was only in Gettysburg about 25 hours yet his short speech changed the face of a nation and the world. This special Lincoln at Gettysburg tour will take in all the important Lincoln sites in Gettysburg. Included as part of this in-depth tour will be the Train Station where Lincoln arrived on November 18, 1863, the newly rehabilitated David Wills House where the President spent the night and completed his immortal words to the Gettysburg Address, The Gettysburg Presbyterian Church where Lincoln attended a political meeting and of course the National Cemetery itself where Lincoln gave his "few appropriate remarks." As part of the program famed living historian James Getty will portray Lincoln and address the group.

Friday Tours

"Confederate Advance to Gettysburg"
with Ted Alexander

We will follow the route of Lee's army into Maryland and Pennsylvania. First stop is Williamsport, MD where part of Lee's army crossed the Potomac River Fords into Maryland. the historic and fabled Mason -Dixon Line where Rebel soldiers entered Pennsylvania; Lee's woods site of the generals first bivouac in Pennsylvania; Greencastle where Union cavalry commander Ulric Dahlgren captured important documents bound for Lee at Gettysburg; Fleming Farm and Corporal Rihl monument and grave, skirmish site of June 22, 1863 where of the death of the first Union soldier on Pennsylvania soil took place; Chambersburg where Lee and A.P. Hill met in a council of war; we will also visit the Chambersburg Heritage Center and view exhibits related to the Civil War and local history. We will also view the site of Lee's camp in Messersmith's Woods where he met the spy Harrison and made the decision to move toward Gettysburg. Stops will also be made in the historic towns of Mercersburg and McConnelsburg - site of skirmishes and rare Confederate graves. As we approach Gettysburg we will view A.P. hill's headquarters at Font Hill in Fayetteville, Pa. and the Thaddeus Stevens iron works that was burned by Juabl Early's men on June 26, 1863. Along the way we will view numerous period homes and barns that have retained their 19th century appearance.

TED ALEXANDER

Ted Alexander is Chief Historian at Antietam National Battlefield and is a 27 years veteran of the National Park Service. He is the author, co -author or editor of four books on the Civil War and has written more than 200 articles and book reviews for publications such as Civil War Times Illustrated, Blue and Gray Magazine, Maryland History, and The Washington Times. He is a frequent lecturer and tour guide for groups such as Johns Hopkins University's Odyssey Program; The Smithsonian Resident Associates, and CAMP - Council of America's Military Past. He is also the founder of coordinator of the Chambersburg Civil War Seminars.

Gettysburg Hiking Tour:
"Longstreet's Assault on the Union Left"
with Charles Fennell

NOTE: Longstreet's Assault on the Union Left is an all day strenuous hiking tour.

General James Longstreet, First Corps Commander of the Army of Northern Virginia called his attack on the Union left flank on July 2nd the "Finest three hours of fighting in the Civil War." Although this statement is debatable, few doubt that some of the most famous fighting of the Battle of Gettysburg resulted from this attack. Furthermore, the two most significant command controversies were involved in the action as well; the Lee-Longstreet controversy and the Sickles-Meade controversy. What make this fighting of even more interest to students of the battle today is that the ground over which the fighting occurred has seen significant rehabilitation recently. For the first time in decades it is now possible to view this area much as the soldiers who fought there. This tour will detail the action at the southern end of the Union line as the men who fought there viewed it on foot. The tour will begin on the Confederate line and trace the fighting through Devil's Den, Little Round Top, the bloody Wheatfield, the Peach Orchard, the Emmitsburg Road, the Codori Thicket and Cemetery Ridge. Not only will the tour cover the fighting that took place, but it will also take notice of the current efforts to restore this hallowed ground to its historical appearance, a battle in its own right.

CHARLIE FENNELL

Charles Fennell was born in Western Pennsylvania and at a very early age acquired an interest in America's Civil War. He pursued this interest in college receiving a BS in History from Frostburg State University, an MA in History from Clarion State University and finally in 1992, a PhD in History from West Virginia University. Charlie became a Licensed Battlefield Guide at Gettysburg National Military Park in 1986 and since then has conducted thousands of tours of the famous battlefield as well as other Civil War sites. Charlie has published several articles pertaining to America's Civil War and has also appeared on Civil War Journal. In addition to his interest in the Civil War, Charlie enjoys teaching. His teaching positions over the years include Graduate Teaching Instructor and Instructor of Military History at West Virginia University. Charlie currently is an Adjunct Professor at Harrisburg Community College Gettysburg Campus a position he has held since 1990.

"Lee's Retreat from Gettysburg"
with Kent Brown

This nine hour tour will follow the routes taken by Lee's Army during the ten days after the fighting ended at Gettysburg. It will begin near Lee's headquarters at Gettysburg and proceed out the Herr Ridge Road to the Fairfield Road, and then follow the path of the Army and its nearly fifty-seven miles of wagons and ambulances to Fairfield, over Monterey Pass, to Hagerstown, and then to the Potomac River crossings at Williamsport and Falling Waters. Stops will be made at the Blackhorse Tavern (one of Lee's brigade hospitals), Fairfield (where Lee stalled Meade's army for more than thirty hours), Monterey Pass (the site of a midnight attack in an electrical storm against Lee's wagon and ambulance trains), the sites of the Battles of Hagerstown, Williamsport, Funkstown, and Falling Waters, and Lee's nine mile long Downsville defense line. Additionally, stops will be made at the river crossings at Williamsport and Falling Waters, and, as an added attraction, a stop will be made at the Washington Monument atop Turner Pass, the site of one of Meade's signal stations, for a panoramic view of the area of operations.

KENT BROWN

Kent Masterson Brown was born in Lexington, Kentucky. He is a graduate of Centre College and received his juris doctor degree from Washington and Lee University School of Law. For the past thirty-three years he has practiced law. He was the creator and first editor of the magazine, The Civil War. He is author of several books, including Cushing of Gettysburg: The Story of a Union Artillery Commander (a history Book Club selection and recipient of the Award of Merit from the Wisconsin Historical Society) and The Civil War in Kentucky: Battle for the Bluegrass State. His most recent book, Retreat from Gettysburg: Lee, Logistics and the Pennsylvania Campaign has been awarded the United States Army Historical Foundation Award for Distinguished Writing in History. He has written numerous articles for a variety of historical publications and journals. He was the first chairman of the Gettysburg National Military Park Advisory Commission.

"First and Second Days at Gettysburg:
The Action in Detail"
with Wayne Motts and Jeffrey Wert

First Day

Marching into battle on July 1st, 1863 few of the hardened veterans of either army then realized the grand scale of the battle about to erupt. Today, many scholars recognize that the desperate engagement fought on the outskirts of Gettysburg on the 1st of July determined the outcome of this epic battle. Join us for an in-depth and engaging tour of the sites associated with the first day of battle. Highlights will include trips to McPherson's Ridge, the Herbst Woods, Seminary Ridge, Oak Hill, Cemetery Hill, and a thorough discussion of the impact of the first day's clash on the remainder of the battle.

Second Day

While the fighting on the second day of battle at Gettysburg only lasted for approximately 6 hours, by day's end nearly 16,000 men fell victim to the combat. As the battle raged, once peaceful farm fields were transformed into scenes of horror and savagery. Join our team of experts as we visit the ground on which this day of battle was fought. Participants will explore Seminary Ridge, The Peach Orchard, Devil's Den, Little Round Top, The Wheatfield, Culp's Hill, and have an opportunity to study the engagements by walking over the actual terrain with experienced guides.

JEFF WERT

Jeffry D. Wert is an award-winning Civil War historian. A retired Pennsylvania high school history teacher, he is the author of more than two hundred magazine articles and columns and eight books. His books are From Winchester To Cedar Creek: The Shenandoah Campaign of 1864; Mosby's Rangers; General James Longstreet; Custer; A Brotherhood Of Valor; Gettysburg--Day Three; The Sword Of Lincoln: The Army of the Potomac; and, Cavalryman of the Lost Cause: A Biography of J. E. B. Stuart. Two of his books--A Brotherhood of Valor and The Sword of Lincoln-- have won the Laney Prize of the Austin Civil War Round Table; the only historian accorded the honor twice. His book, Gettysburg--Day Three, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award. He has also received awards for outstanding Civil War scholarship. He currently conducts tours of the Gettysburg battlefield.

WAYNE MOTTS

Wayne A. Motts was born and raised in central Ohio; Wayne graduated from The Ohio State University with a B.A. in history in 1989. Moving to Gettysburg in 1990, Wayne earned a Masters Degree in American History from the Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania in 1994. He was one of the youngest persons ever to complete the licensing process to be a Licensed Battlefield Guide at Gettysburg National Military Park. He has guided parties around the famous field for over 20 years. Wayne has published several pieces related to the American Civil War in a variety of publications. He is considered the leading authority in the nation on Southern General Lewis Addison Armistead of Pickett's Charge fame and has published the only biography of the general entitled, Trust in God and Fear Nothing: Lewis A. Armistead, CSA. Wayne is currently the executive director of the Adams County Historical Society, headquartered inside Schmucker Hall on the campus of the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg in the heart of the July 1, 1863 battleground. He oversees a collection of more than a million items related to Adams County.

"First and Second Days at Gettysburg:
An Overview"
with Richard McMurry

First Day

Marching into battle on July 1st, 1863 few of the hardened veterans of either army then realized the grand scale of the battle about to erupt. Today, many scholars recognize that the desperate engagement fought on the outskirts of Gettysburg on the 1st of July determined the outcome of this epic battle. Join us for an in-depth and engaging tour of the sites associated with the first day of battle. Highlights will include trips to McPherson's Ridge, the Herbst Woods, Seminary Ridge, Oak Hill, Cemetery Hill, and a thorough discussion of the impact of the first day's clash on the remainder of the battle.

Second Day

While the fighting on the second day of battle at Gettysburg only lasted for approximately 6 hours, by day's end nearly 16,000 men fell victim to the combat. As the battle raged, once peaceful farm fields were transformed into scenes of horror and savagery. Join our team of experts as we visit the ground on which this day of battle was fought. Participants will explore Seminary Ridge, The Peach Orchard, Devil's Den, Little Round Top, The Wheatfield, Culp's Hill, and have an opportunity to study the engagements by walking over the actual terrain with experienced guides.

RICHARD MCMURRY

A native of Atlanta, Richard McMurry received a B.A. degree in history from the Virginia Military Institute. Following service in the U.S. Army, he entered Emory University in 1963 and received his PhD in June 1967. Since 1988, after 20 years of teaching, McMurry has been a freelance writer and speaker and a guide/historian for many tour and cruise groups. His book, John Bell Hood and the War for Southern Independence, received the Mrs. Simon Baruch University Award presented by the United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Fletcher Pratt Award from the New York Civil War Round Table. McMurry also wrote Virginia Military Institute Alumni in the Civil War: in Bello Praesidium. His Atlanta 1864: Last Chance for the Confederacy received the Laney Prize from the Austin Civil War Round Table. McMurry's The Fourth Battle of Winchester: Toward a New Civil War Paradigm was published in 2002. In 2005, the Chicago Civil War Round Table honored McMurry with its Nevins-Freeman Award for outstanding work in Civil War history. Richard McMurry has lectured on the Civil War in 30 states and the District of Columbia; he is a member of numerous historical societies and lives and writes in Dalton, Georgia.

"Hidden Places of Gettysburg"
with Ed Bearss

There are areas associated with the Battle of Gettysburg which are seldom visited. Ed Bearss will take you there. We will tour Neill Avenue (Lost Avenue) where, on July 3, 1863, General Thomas Neill's Brigade skirmished with the 2nd Virginians of the Stonewall Brigade. Surrounded by private property it is one of the least visited areas on the Battlefield. The avenue, with its monuments, original stonewalls and surrounding fields and woods is considered one of the most pristine areas on the battlefield. We will climb Power's Hill, the location of Slocum's Headquarters, a signal corps station, and artillery platform. We will visit the privately owned Daniel Lady farm. The historical barn and house were used as a Confederate Hospital. General Johnson's Division was located on the farm before their attack on Culp's Hill. We will go to Fairfield where the 6th U.S. Cavalry and Grumble Jones Virginians fought on July 3, 1863. These tours and several other places we will visit will give you a chance to see a part of the Battlefield seldom seen. Some of these tours are long, rugged walks over rough terrain. To enjoy this tour you should be in able to do some walking at various times during the day.

EDWIN C. BEARSS

Historian Emeritus of the National Park Service, Director's Special Assistant for Military Sites, and former Chief Historian at the National Park Service, Ed Bearss is the winner of multiple history and preservation awards including: the T. Harry Williams Award, the Bruce Catton Award, the Bell I. Wiley Award and the Harry S. Truman Award for Meritorious Service in the field of Civil War History. In addition to being the preeminent guide to battlefields nationwide, Ed Bearss is the author of several Civil War histories. Among them are The Vicksburg Campaign: Vicksburg is the Key and Battle of Five Forks.

"Harrisburg Harried"
with Dick Sommers

The 1863 Pennsylvania Campaign is known as the Gettysburg Campaign because of the great battle there. Yet General Lee did not come to Pennsylvania primarily to fight at Gettysburg. Many other facets highlighted the campaign besides that one battle. Our field trip "Harrisburg Harried" explores some of them -- for their own sake and for their insights into overall Confederate strategy. Richard S. Ewell led the Graycoats into Pennsylvania through Greencastle, Chambersburg, and Shippensburg to Carlisle. He reached Carlisle, June 27. His artillery brigade and nine infantry brigades massed in and around that borough. His cavalry brigade reconnoitered eastward, scouting approaches to Harrisburg and skirmishing with defenders at Oyster Point and Sporting Hill. Ewell planned to follow his horsemen eastward, June 29, to pluck the prizes: severing the railroad crossings of the Susquehanna, seizing the state capital, perhaps even striking into the strategic coal country east of the river. Instead, he received orders that day to rejoin the main army southward in Adams County. His troops left, June 29-30. When "Jeb" Stuart's cavalry reached Carlisle, July 1, expecting to complete their week-long raid by joining Ewell, his infantry were gone, and Federal troops from Harrisburg defended the borough. Neither side wanted a battle there, but they fought one, anyway. Our field trip covers the Confederate occupation of Carlisle, their scouting eastward, the surviving Harrisburg defenses, the combats at Oyster Point and Sporting Hill, and the epic Battle of Carlisle -- which some people (though not all) think eclipses the simultaneous fighting at Gettysburg on July 1.

DICK SOMMERS

Dr. Richard J. (Dick) Sommers has participated in CWPT's meetings since Richmond in 2003 as panelist and speaker, and he also took part in APCWS's 1997-1998 meetings. He is a Life Member of APCWS/CWPT. A native of Hammond, Indiana, Dick grew up in suburban Chicagoland. He earned his B.A. from Carleton College and his doctorate from Rice University, where he had the privilege of studying under Frank Vandiver. Since 1970, Dick has worked at the U.S. Army Military History Institute. He was an Assistant Director there, 1997-2007; held the "General Harold Keith Johnson Professorship of Military History" in academic year 2008; and currently serves as the Senior Historian of the Institute and its parent organization, the U.S. Army Heritage & Education Center. Since 1971, he has been active in the Harrisburg Civil War Round Table, serving three years as President and 27 years as Program Chairman. He has just resumed the latter office. Military history has always fascinated Dick. His research and writing focus on the Siege of Petersburg, both north and south of James River. His book, Richmond Redeemed: the Siege at Petersburg, earned the National Historical Society's Bell Wiley Prize as the best Civil War book of 1981-1982. All military aspects of the Civil War interest him.

"Devil's Den: Fighting, Photos, and Folklore"
with Garry Adleman and Timothy Smith

Known largely for stories for tales of sharpshooters and ghosts, Devil's Den was in actuality a fierce battleground for which more than 5,000 men fought. The 1,800 Union and Confederate casualties in and around the Den created a ghastly aftermath which were caught by the camera's lens just after the battle. Devil's Den soon evolved into a popular tourist attraction complete with dance halls, drinking establishments, photo galleries, and an electric railway stop. While these commercial enterprises and most evidence of the battle are long gone, traces are still evident in a place which captivates visitors to this day. Join Licensed Battlefield Guides Garry Adelman and Tim Smith for a tour covering the fighting leading up to, including and following the struggle for Devil's Den. Stand where the photographers recorded images of the dead on July 6, 1863. With nomenclature, fighting, aftermath, then & now photography, geology, all aspects of Devil's Den and the surrounding areas (including Rose Woods, the Triangular Field and the Devil's Kitchen) will be covered. Scores of images and first-hand accounts will be used to separate myth from fact. Involves approximately 1/2 mile of walking in intervals; some rugged terrain will be encountered.

GARRY ADELMAN

A native of the Chicago area, Garry Adelman earned his B.A. in business from Michigan State University and his M.A. in history at Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania. He is the author or co-author of Antietam: Then & Now (2005), The Myth of Little Round Top (2003), The Early Gettysburg Battlefield (2001), Little Round Top: A Detailed Tour Guide (2000), and Devil's Den: A History and Guide (1997). He has published articles in The Gettysburg Magazine and the Civil War Preservation Trust's Hallowed Ground and has served as editor for several Civil War image booklets. He conceived and drafted the text for wayside exhibits at the Third Winchester and First Day at Chancellorsville battlefields. A frequent lecturer at Civil War Round Tables, he has also appeared as a speaker on the History Channel, C-Span, and Pennsylvania Cable Network. He is the vice president of the Center for Civil War Photography and a Licensed Battlefield Guide at Gettysburg. His The Civil War Then & Now: War in the East will be published in 2010. He works full time as a historian at History Associates Incorporated in Rockville, MD.

TIMOTHY SMITH

Timothy H. Smith is a native of Baltimore and a lifelong student of the American Civil War. He is employed as a Licensed Battlefield Guide at the Gettysburg National Military Park and a reference historian at the Adams County Historical Society. His teaches courses at the Gettysburg Campus of the Harrisburg Area Community College, and the Gettysburg Elderhostel. As a consultant, he has been involved in several projects for Civil War Preservation Trust. He has lectured at seminars and Civil War Round Tables, has been a guide on Pennsylvania Cable Network's tour series, and appeared in several documentaries. He has written numerous articles and ten books on the Civil War and local history, including Devil's Den: A History and Guide, co-authored with Garry Adelman. He is the author of a feature article in a recent issue of Blue and Gray Magazine entitled "25 hours at Gettysburg," concerning Abraham Lincoln's visit.

Museums of Gettysburg

Stops to include:

    * The National Apple Museum
    * The Shriver House Museum
    * The Farnsworth House
    * The David Wills House
    * The Historic Lincoln Train Station

Saturday Tours

"Union Advance to Gettysburg"
with Ted Alexander

Join us as we follow the route of the Army of the Potomac on the roads to Gettysburg. Sites viewed will include the Prospect Hall in Frederick where Meade took command of the army, Arcadia - Hookers headquarters near Frederick, historic B& O Station in Frederick, Hancock's headquarters in Uniontown, Meade's headquarters site and Union signal station at Lutheran church in Taneytown, historic Union Mills - campsite of Jeb Stuart's cavalry and union 5th Corps, Howard's headquarters and 11th Corps camp at Mt. Saint Joseph's in Emmitsburg, Union Bridge where Gen. Reynolds body was placed on a train for home, Morritz Tavern, where Reynolds spent his last night on earth, Pipe Creek which was Meade's secondary defense to protect Washington and much more.

TED ALEXANDER

Ted Alexander is Chief Historian at Antietam National Battlefield and is a 27 years veteran of the National Park Service. He is the author, co -author or editor of four books on the Civil War and has written more than 200 articles and book reviews for publications such as Civil War Times Illustrated, Blue and Gray Magazine, Maryland History, and The Washington Times. He is a frequent lecturer and tour guide for groups such as Johns Hopkins University's Odyssey Program; The Smithsonian Resident Associates, and CAMP - Council of America's Military Past. He is also the founder of coordinator of the Chambersburg Civil War Seminars.

Gettysburg Hiking Tour:
"The Union Fishhook"
with Garry Adleman and Timothy Smith

The Battle of Gettysburg was not fought in the neat and tidy sections often described by historians. The battle flowed from place to place. Regiments, brigades, divisions and corps overlapped and commingled. To understand the exceedingly complex battle, therefore, one can gain the most insight not by driving around and getting out, but by walking. By so doing, the complexities of the battle fall better into place. What is the relationship between the fighting at Devil's Den and that of the Wheatfield? Why did Confederates fail to see dozens of cannons on Cemetery Ridge before it was too late? Was the fighting at Pardee Field and at Lower Culp's Hill one and the same? Join Licensed Battlefield Guides Garry Adelman and Tim Smith as we endeavor to walk the length of the entire Union Fishhook position (July 2 and 3, 1863). While the tour will generally follow the Fishhook, expect side trips and excursions off roads and trails. Plan for at least four miles of walking and steep ascents up the hills known to us all.

GARRY ADELMAN

A native of the Chicago area, Garry Adelman earned his B.A. in business from Michigan State University and his M.A. in history at Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania. He is the author or co-author of Antietam: Then & Now (2005), The Myth of Little Round Top (2003), The Early Gettysburg Battlefield (2001), Little Round Top: A Detailed Tour Guide (2000), and Devil's Den: A History and Guide (1997). He has published articles in The Gettysburg Magazine and the Civil War Preservation Trust's Hallowed Ground and has served as editor for several Civil War image booklets. He conceived and drafted the text for wayside exhibits at the Third Winchester and First Day at Chancellorsville battlefields. A frequent lecturer at Civil War Round Tables, he has also appeared as a speaker on the History Channel, C-Span, and Pennsylvania Cable Network. He is the vice president of the Center for Civil War Photography and a Licensed Battlefield Guide at Gettysburg. His The Civil War Then & Now: War in the East will be published in 2010. He works full time as a historian at History Associates Incorporated in Rockville, MD.

TIMOTHY SMITH

Timothy H. Smith is a native of Baltimore and a lifelong student of the American Civil War. He is employed as a Licensed Battlefield Guide at the Gettysburg National Military Park and a reference historian at the Adams County Historical Society. His teaches courses at the Gettysburg Campus of the Harrisburg Area Community College, and the Gettysburg Elderhostel. As a consultant, he has been involved in several projects for Civil War Preservation Trust. He has lectured at seminars and Civil War Round Tables, has been a guide on Pennsylvania Cable Network's tour series, and appeared in several documentaries. He has written numerous articles and ten books on the Civil War and local history, including Devil's Den: A History and Guide, co-authored with Garry Adelman. He is the author of a feature article in a recent issue of Blue and Gray Magazine entitled "25 hours at Gettysburg," concerning Abraham Lincoln's visit.

"Lee's Retreat from Gettysburg"
with Kent Brown

This nine hour tour will follow the routes taken by Lee's Army during the ten days after the fighting ended at Gettysburg. It will begin near Lee's headquarters at Gettysburg and proceed out the Herr Ridge Road to the Fairfield Road, and then follow the path of the Army and its nearly fifty-seven miles of wagons and ambulances to Fairfield, over Monterey Pass, to Hagerstown, and then to the Potomac River crossings at Williamsport and Falling Waters. Stops will be made at the Blackhorse Tavern (one of Lee's brigade hospitals), Fairfield (where Lee stalled Meade's army for more than thirty hours), Monterey Pass (the site of a midnight attack in an electrical storm against Lee's wagon and ambulance trains), the sites of the Battles of Hagerstown, Williamsport, Funkstown, and Falling Waters, and Lee's nine mile long Downsville defense line. Additionally, stops will be made at the river crossings at Williamsport and Falling Waters, and, as an added attraction, a stop will be made at the Washington Monument atop Turner Pass, the site of one of Meade's signal stations, for a panoramic view of the area of operations.

KENT BROWN

Kent Masterson Brown was born in Lexington, Kentucky. He is a graduate of Centre College and received his juris doctor degree from Washington and Lee University School of Law. For the past thirty-three years he has practiced law. He was the creator and first editor of the magazine, The Civil War. He is author of several books, including Cushing of Gettysburg: The Story of a Union Artillery Commander (a history Book Club selection and recipient of the Award of Merit from the Wisconsin Historical Society) and The Civil War in Kentucky: Battle for the Bluegrass State. His most recent book, Retreat from Gettysburg: Lee, Logistics and the Pennsylvania Campaign has been awarded the United States Army Historical Foundation Award for Distinguished Writing in History. He has written numerous articles for a variety of historical publications and journals. He was the first chairman of the Gettysburg National Military Park Advisory Commission.

"Third Day at Gettysburg :
The Action in Detail"
with Wayne Motts and Jeffrey Wert

July 3rd, 1863 remains to this day one of the most pivotal moments in United States history. Following failed early morning assaults against Union positions on Culp's Hill, Robert E. Lee's decision to order a frontal assault against the center of the Union lines on Cemetery Ridge is still one of the most controversial decisions of his entire military career. With our expert historian as your guide, join us to learn more about the attack, the decisions, and the staggering results. Participants will visit Seminary Ridge, Cemetery Ridge, and a multitude of points in between as they retrace the steps of Union and Confederate soldiers on the same rolling fields south of Gettysburg.

JEFF WERT

Jeffry D. Wert is an award-winning Civil War historian. A retired Pennsylvania high school history teacher, he is the author of more than two hundred magazine articles and columns and eight books. His books are From Winchester To Cedar Creek: The Shenandoah Campaign of 1864; Mosby's Rangers; General James Longstreet; Custer; A Brotherhood Of Valor; Gettysburg--Day Three; The Sword Of Lincoln: The Army of the Potomac; and, Cavalryman of the Lost Cause: A Biography of J. E. B. Stuart. Two of his books--A Brotherhood of Valor and The Sword of Lincoln-- have won the Laney Prize of the Austin Civil War Round Table; the only historian accorded the honor twice. His book, Gettysburg--Day Three, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award. He has also received awards for outstanding Civil War scholarship. He currently conducts tours of the Gettysburg battlefield.

WAYNE MOTTS

Wayne A. Motts was born and raised in central Ohio; Wayne graduated from The Ohio State University with a B.A. in history in 1989. Moving to Gettysburg in 1990, Wayne earned a Masters Degree in American History from the Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania in 1994. He was one of the youngest persons ever to complete the licensing process to be a Licensed Battlefield Guide at Gettysburg National Military Park. He has guided parties around the famous field for over 20 years. Wayne has published several pieces related to the American Civil War in a variety of publications. He is considered the leading authority in the nation on Southern General Lewis Addison Armistead of Pickett's Charge fame and has published the only biography of the general entitled, Trust in God and Fear Nothing: Lewis A. Armistead, CSA. Wayne is currently the executive director of the Adams County Historical Society, headquartered inside Schmucker Hall on the campus of the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg in the heart of the July 1, 1863 battleground. He oversees a collection of more than a million items related to Adams County.

"Third Day at Gettysburg: An Overview"
with Richard McMurry

July 3rd, 1863 remains to this day one of the most pivotal moments in United States history. Following failed early morning assaults against Union positions on Culp's Hill, Robert E. Lee's decision to order a frontal assault against the center of the Union lines on Cemetery Ridge is still one of the most controversial decisions of his entire military career. With our expert historian as your guide, join us to learn more about the attack, the decisions, and the staggering results. Participants will visit Seminary Ridge, Cemetery Ridge, and a multitude of points in between as they retrace the steps of Union and Confederate soldiers on the same rolling fields south of Gettysburg.

RICHARD MCMURRY

A native of Atlanta, Richard McMurry received a B.A. degree in history from the Virginia Military Institute. Following service in the U.S. Army, he entered Emory University in 1963 and received his PhD in June 1967. Since 1988, after 20 years of teaching, McMurry has been a freelance writer and speaker and a guide/historian for many tour and cruise groups. His book, John Bell Hood and the War for Southern Independence, received the Mrs. Simon Baruch University Award presented by the United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Fletcher Pratt Award from the New York Civil War Round Table. McMurry also wrote Virginia Military Institute Alumni in the Civil War: in Bello Praesidium. His Atlanta 1864: Last Chance for the Confederacy received the Laney Prize from the Austin Civil War Round Table. McMurry's The Fourth Battle of Winchester: Toward a New Civil War Paradigm was published in 2002. In 2005, the Chicago Civil War Round Table honored McMurry with its Nevins-Freeman Award for outstanding work in Civil War history. Richard McMurry has lectured on the Civil War in 30 states and the District of Columbia; he is a member of numerous historical societies and lives and writes in Dalton, Georgia.

"Hidden Places of Gettysburg"
with Ed Bearss

There are areas associated with the Battle of Gettysburg which are seldom visited. Ed Bearss will take you there. We will tour Neill Avenue (Lost Avenue) where, on July 3, 1863, General Thomas Neill's Brigade skirmished with the 2nd Virginians of the Stonewall Brigade. Surrounded by private property it is one of the least visited areas on the Battlefield. The avenue, with its monuments, original stonewalls and surrounding fields and woods is considered one of the most pristine areas on the battlefield. We will climb Power's Hill, the location of Slocum's Headquarters, a signal corps station, and artillery platform. We will visit the privately owned Daniel Lady farm. The historical barn and house were used as a Confederate Hospital. General Johnson's Division was located on the farm before their attack on Culp's Hill. We will go to Fairfield where the 6th U.S. Cavalry and Grumble Jones Virginians fought on July 3, 1863. These tours and several other places we will visit will give you a chance to see a part of the Battlefield seldom seen. Some of these tours are long, rugged walks over rough terrain. To enjoy this tour you should be in able to do some walking at various times during the day.

EDWIN C. BEARSS

Historian Emeritus of the National Park Service, Director's Special Assistant for Military Sites, and former Chief Historian at the National Park Service, Ed Bearss is the winner of multiple history and preservation awards including: the T. Harry Williams Award, the Bruce Catton Award, the Bell I. Wiley Award and the Harry S. Truman Award for Meritorious Service in the field of Civil War History. In addition to being the preeminent guide to battlefields nationwide, Ed Bearss is the author of several Civil War histories. Among them are The Vicksburg Campaign: Vicksburg is the Key and Battle of Five Forks.

Calvary Tour:
"The East and South Cavalry Fields"
with Eric Wittenberg

Spend the day with cavalry expert Eric Wittenberg as we cover the lesser-known cavalry actions that took place on July 3, 1863. In the morning, we will focus on the south end of the battlefield with walking tours of Wesley Merritt's attack on South Cavalry Field, followed by a walking tour that covers the traditional interpretation of Farnsworth's Charge, including Bushman's Hill, the Slyder Farm, and the D-shaped field where Farnsworth fell. This tour involves quite a bit of walking over rough terrain, much of which is uphill, and some of which is quite steep. It is not for the faint of heart, and if you have any questions about your ability to complete the hike, please err on the side of caution. After lunch, we will visit the site of the July 2 fight between Brig. Gen. David M. Gregg's cavalry division and the 2nd Virginia Infantry of the legendary Stonewall Brigade for possession of Brinkerhoff's Ridge. From there, we will travel to East Cavalry Field, where we will make multiple stops to review the actions there, including a visit to the barn of the Rummell Farm.

ERIC WITTENBERG

Eric J. Wittenberg is a nationally recognized authority on Civil War cavalry actions. He is the author of fifteen published books on the Civil War, most of which deal with the Army of the Potomac's Cavalry Corps. His first book, Gettysburg's Forgotten Cavalry Actions, won the Bachelder-Coddington Literary Award as the best new book interpreting the Battle of Gettysburg of 1998. His works include the critically acclaimed _Protecting the Flank: The Fights for Brinkerhoff's Ridge and East Cavalry Field, Battle of Gettysburg, July 2-3, 1863_, _Plenty of Blame to Go Around: Jeb Stuart's Controversial Ride to Gettysburg_, and _One Continuous Fight: The Retreat from Gettysburg and the Pursuit of Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, July 4-14, 1863 (both with J. David Petruzzi). He and Mr. Petruzzi are presently working on the next volume in their Gettysburg trilogy, which will be titled: _For Want of a Nail: The Retreat and Pursuit of Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, July 15-August 1, 1863_. Eric is a native of Reading, Pennsylvania. He was educated at Dickinson College and the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, and is a partner in a law firm. He, his wife Susan, and their two golden retrievers live in Columbus, Ohio.

"The Aftermath of Gettysburg"
with Nick Redding

As the fighting ended at Gettysburg one participant described the aftermath as a "vast sea of misery." Soldiers and civilians came together to lessen the suffering and bury the dead all across the once tranquil farms. Though often overlooked, the history of the aftermath remains a fascinating and dreadful post-script to the much studied battle. Join us for a day long tour of sites associated with the aftermath of Gettysburg as we travel to unique locations throughout the area. Participants will visit several farmsteads, homes and barns, including the recently preserved field hospital of the XI corps, several Confederate field hospitals and aid stations, Camp Letterman, overlooked burial sites and a visit to the Soldier's National Cemetery. The tour will also discuss the state of medical care in the mid nineteenth century as well the greater context of the aftermath in American culture.

NICHOLAS REDDING

Nick Redding is originally from Buffalo, New York, and is an alumnus of Shepherd University in Shepherdstown, West Virginia where he graduated with a Bachelors of History concentrated in Civil War & 19th century America. Nicholas is a real estate associate with the Civil War Preservation Trust and is responsible for managing and expanding CWPT's use of grant funding available for battlefield preservation from federal, state and local government entities, as well as other non-profit organizations. Prior to his employment with the Trust he served as a Park Ranger with the National Park Service at both the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal National Historical Park and at Gettysburg National Military Park.

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